Jamming with Edward!

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Jamming with Edward!

FEATURED Jamming with Edward!

JAMMING WITH EDWARD is an impromptu recording made during the Rolling Stones’ LET IT BLEED studio sessions.
Personnel: Mick Jagger (vocals); Ry Cooder (guitar); Nicky Hopkins (piano);
Bill Wyman (bass); Charlie Watts (drums).

1. Boudoir Stomp

2. It Hurts Me Too

3. Edward’s Thrump Up

4. Blow With Ry

5. Interlude a la el Hopo

6. Highland Fling

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3 thoughts on “Jamming with Edward!

  1. 47 of 48 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    The Truth about Edward, April 18, 2001
    By 
    Dean Kuschell “DETROIT DEAN” (Traverse City, MI USA) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Jamming With Edward (Audio CD)

    This album was actually recorded around 1969 during the “Let It Bleed sessions when Ry Cooder added mandolin on “Love In Vain” and slide guitar for “Sister Morphine” (later to appear on “Sticky Fingers.”) The album however was not released until 1972. Hence the confusion in some of the reviews of this disc. The session took place while waiting for Keef to show. Just Cooder, the Stones rhythm section, Watts & Wyman, Mick and piano great Nicky Hopkins the alais “Edward.” This is just a jam session with great sound quality even though Jagger gets buried in the mix. The album centers around Hopkins, Watts, Wyman and Cooder so that fact that Mick is buried in the mix is insignificant. This rocks! This boogies! As the liner notes say, “What was the point of having your own record label in you couldn’t indulge a whim every once in a while?” Plus the original liner notes by Mick himself are a hoot as he adds, “I hope you spend longer listening to this than we did making it. Too judge this album as you would other albums in the Stones cannon is foolish. But still I find it to be a worthwhile addition to any true fan of the Stones, Nicky Hopkins or Ry Cooder. If you’re not tappin your toes or dancing to this I would have someone check your pulse.

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  2. 28 of 28 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    A Real Treat, November 1, 2004
    By 
    Guy Incognito (Florida) –

    This review is from: Jamming With Edward (Audio CD)

    After I got hooked on the Rolling Stones’ ’68-74 material, I pretty much acquired everything I could find from this time period, including a lot of imported and bootlegged material. I hadn’t heard of this 1972 official release until recently, and picked it up as soon as I got the chance.

    I had a feeling I would really enjoy this album. I’ve always loved Nicky Hopkins piano work with the Stones, and the same goes for Ry Cooder’s contributions to the Stones’ albums. Of course, little needs to be said about the three actual Stones that appear on this album. Jagger’s celebrity status has overshadowed his incredible understanding of blues singing, and he adds some excellent, murky vocal touches to this album along with harmonica. Drummer Watts and bassist Wyman are together, quite simply, a perfect rhythm section for this kind of music.

    There is about 35 minutes of music here, all recorded in 1969 while the musicians waited for Keith Richards to get to the studio. You will find this CD listed as a Rolling Stones album, but the real stars here are Hopkins and Cooder. In most of his work with the Stones, Hopkins was left to jam along in the background, providing a lovely melodious backdrop for the Richards/Taylor guitar combo. In almost all of these songs, Hopkins is allowed to really shine. It’s exhilarating, fast-paced, old-fashioned boogie. The piano is most prominently featured on the third track, entitled “Edward’s Thump Up”.

    If you liked Ry Cooder’s sound on “Sister Morphine” from the Sticky Fingers album, you will certainly enjoy his playing on Jamming With Edward. This recording is from before the Mick Taylor era, so it’s really the first time the Stones recorded something with a truly great lead guitarist. Cooder’s guitar is terrific throughout, but it’s at its best on the fourth track, “Blow With Ry”. He and Watts hit a groove that last for eleven blissful minutes.

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  3. 26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars
    NOT a Stones Album, But Great Anyway, July 12, 2002
    By 
    Steven R. Seim “Steve Seim” (Beaver Dam, WI United States) –
    (REAL NAME)
      

    This review is from: Jamming With Edward (Audio CD)

    “Jamming with Edward” is often catalogued/reviewed as a Rolling Stones release, with the result that listeners are often disappointed. It’s actually a Nicky Hopkins/Ry Cooder jam session with backing by the Stones’ rhythm section and a little vocalizing by Mick.

    That said, it is a rare gem from the peak era of British blues-rock. It’s tasteful, laid-back, funky/bluesy jamming by some of the best sidemen in the business. It also has the energy and interplay that you only get on great live-in-the-studio recordings.

    Don’t expect the Rolling Stones, but you may be pleasantly surprised by what you get instead.

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